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                                      How to Qualify for Social Security Disability

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                                      Applying for and winning Social Security Disability Insurance (“SSDI”) benefits can be extremely challenging. Not only must you prove that you are disabled according to the Social Security Administration’s Guidelines, but you also must have a work history that is long enough to qualify for SSDI.Social Security Disability

                                      To determine whether your work history makes you eligible for SSDI, the Social Security Administration measures how much you have worked in terms of “Social Security Quarters.” You can earn at least one and up to four quarters per year of work at age 21 or older.

                                      The number of credits necessary to qualify depends on your age. The rules are as follows:

                                      • Before age 24 - You may qualify if you have 6 quarters worked in the 3-year period ending when your disability starts.
                                      • Age 24 to 31 – In general, you may qualify if you have credit for working half the time between age 21 and the time you become disabled. As a general example, if you become disabled at age 27, you would need 3 years of work (12 quarters) out of the past 6 years (between ages 21 and 27).
                                      • Age 31 or older - In general, you must have at least 20 quarters in the 10-year period immediately before you become disabled. This is also known as the 5-in-10 rule.

                                      There are also monetary thresholds that are attached to the credits. These change from year to year based on the decision of the Social Security Administration.

                                      If you are seeking representation for SSDI call today for a free consultation with our experienced Social Security Disability Attorneys 800-709-1131.

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